For mankind, the practice of engraving has been an essential part of human communication since the beginning of civilisation. Caveman drawings were discovered in Java, Indonesia more than 500,000 years ago engravings found on shells were thoughts to be made by our precursor homo erectus engraved etchings were created on the walls of caves and engraved on ancient rocks and some still remain to this date.

Advanced engraving was developed over centuries and by the time of the Egyptian and Greek empires, engraving was used as a form of documentation and communication. To this day documentation from ancient Egyptians remain around the world, leaving an insight into an ancient world and the way life was lived. Engraving has also been used as a form of communication and documentation, and has also been used to reproduce artwork, printing templates were engraved out of metal to reproduce books, newspapers and currency. In modern times engravings are used to produce unique moulds to create currency all over the world.

Traditional engraving has been carried out by hand chiselling, removing material to produce the text or design. Rotary machines started to be used to increase the speed at which engraving could be carried out mechanically cut away the material.

Since the invention of the Laser in 1960 the process of engraving was revolutionised as it uses only amplified light to engrave virtually any material, giving it an advantage over hand and rotary engraving exponentially.

 

 

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